Food Science

FOOD SCIENCE

If your fascination with food reaches way beyond shopping and meal prep, you can level up with UBC’s Food Science program. Here, you’ll discover the chemistry and microbiology of food, as well as its nutritional and sensory properties, how it’s engineered, and how it’s processed for consumption. Dig deep into quality assurance, and learn about preservation and the safe development of food products. Explore concepts and controversies in nutrition, and examine how land, food and community fit together, all within the world’s most influential scientific research institution for food science and technology.

What You Need to Know

Food Science at UBC is a way to make your mark. In 2016, UBC was named the most influential scientific research institution in food science and technology in the world. Now that’s some great credibility. Add to that the fact that Food Science is taught by passionate, skilled researchers and teachers who are at the top of their game. You couldn’t be in a better place if you have a passion for sciences and want to parlay that into a career that explores the science of food — and UBC’s is the only Food Science Bachelor of Science offered in British Columbia.

In pursuing this major, you’ll be eligible to apply for IFT, or Canadian Institute of Food Science and Technology (CIFST) scholarships, providing you’re a member of the association.

In Food Science, you will apply knowledge from the fields of chemistry, biology and engineering to foods. You will learn how foods change during processing, how food preservation works, and how to assess the sensory qualities of food. You will also learn about foodborne illness and how to prevent it, as well as other aspects of food safety and quality control. On top of this deep disciplinary foundation, you’ll build essential skills that will help you find excellent employment in the field: things like collaborative work, hands-on practical experience in the lab, written and oral communication skills, and research skills. Over the course of your studies, you will be involved in several industry projects and events, each of which will further hone your ability to collaborate and interact with industry professionals. Food Science is a small major within LFS, which means your instructors and mentors can support you in connecting with industry professionals in pursuit of your passions. The Food Science major is a professional program accredited by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT). Widely recognized in the United States and increasingly here in Canada, IFT certification after graduation benefits your career by demonstrating your competency to potential employers. It is not, however, a requirement for employment in the field.

In Food Science, you will take a combination of degree requirements (required of all students) and restricted electives (courses selected from a curated list of approved electives). You will also take a limited number of unrestricted electives (courses you get to pick yourself).

Future food scientists will need a strong foundation in science-based courses, so you’ll be taking chemistry, biology, math and physics. Once you’ve developed that science base, you’ll explore courses like:

  • FNH 303: Food Product Development
  • FNH 330: Introduction to Wine Science I
  • FNH 403: Food Laws, Regulations and Quality Assurance
  • FNH 405: Microbiology of Food and Beverage Fermentation
  • FNH 415: Business Concepts in Food, Nutrition and Health

To see the complete list of required courses for this program, please consult the UBC Academic Calendar. Current students, please use the ‘Degree Navigator’ tool in your Student Service Centre (SSC) to track your progress.

Plan Ahead – make sure you have pre-requisite classes for third and fourth year REs (restricted electives) that you wish to take.

Please consult the credit exclusion list when choosing REs: http://www.calendar.ubc.ca/vancouver/index.cfm?tree=12,215,410,414

This list contains courses with sufficient overlap that credit may be obtained for only one of the courses.

The following courses are permitted for FNH, Food Science or Food and Nutritional Sciences Double Major students as REs UNLESS the course is required for your program. For permission to take other REs, please contact Dr. Vivien Measday. Health Electives (HE) are marked with an asterisk (*). HEs may also be used as REs if all HE requirements have been met. Please note that students who chose their major prior to 2017W are not required to take any HEs, as HEs are a new degree requirement. Please contact students@landfood.ubc.ca if you have questions about this.

2nd Year Restricted Electives

  • ANTH100 (3/4) – Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
  • ANTH201 (3) Ethnic Relations
  • ANTH202 (3/6) – Contemporary Social Problems
  • ANTH217 (3) – Culture and Communication
  • ANTH210 (3) – Eating Culture
  • ANTH220 (3) – First Nations of British Columbia
  • APBI260 (6) – Agroecology I: Introduction to principles and techniques
  • APBI265 (3) – Sustainable Agriculture and Food Systems
  • APBI290 (3) – Introductory Topics in Applied Biology
  • BIOC202 (3) – Introductory Medical Biochemistry
  • BIOC203 (3) – Fundamentals of Biochemistry
  • BIOL204 (4) – Vertebrate Structure and Function
  • BIOL205 (4) – Comparative Invertebrate Zoology
  • BIOL230 (3) – Fundamentals of Ecology
  • BIOL233 (3) – Genetics for Life
  • BIOL234 (3) – Fundamentals of Genetics
  • BIOL260 (3) – Fundamentals of Physiology
  • CHBE230 (3) – Computational Methods
  • CHBE241 (3) – Material and Energy Balances CHBE251 (3) – Transport Phenomena I
  • CHEM205 (3) – Physical Chemistry
  • CHEM211 (4) – Introduction to Chemical Analysis
  • ECON101 (3) – Principles of Microeconomics
  • ECON102 (3) – Principles of Macroeconomics
  • ECON221 (3) – Introduction to Strategic Thinking
  • ECON226 (3) - Making Sense of Economic Data
  • ECON234 (3) - Wealth and Poverty of Nations
  • ECON255 (3) - Understanding Globalization
  • ENVR200 (3) – Introduction to Environmental Science
  • FNH290 (3) – Introductory Topics in Food, Nutrition and Health
  • FMST210 (3) – Family Context of Human Development
  • FRE295 (3) – Managerial Economics
  • KIN190 (3) – Anatomy & Physiology I
  • KIN191 (3) - Anatomy & Physiology II
  • KIN230 (3) – Human Motor Behaviour I
  • KIN231 (3) – Sport and Exercise Psychology
  • KIN261 (3) – Health Policy and Society
  • KIN275 (3) – Exercise Physiology I
  • KIN284 (3) – Lifespan Motor Development
  • MICB201 (3) -Introduction to Environmental Microbiology
  • MICB202 (3) – Introductory Medical Microbiology and Immunology
  • MICB203 (3) – Basic Microbiology Laboratory
  • PCTH201 (3) – Drugs and Society
  • PHYS101 (3) – Energy and Waves
  • PHYS102 (3) – Electricity, Light and Radiation
  • PHYS117 (3) – Dynamics and Waves
  • PHYS153 (6) – Elements of Physics
  • PSYC100 (6) – Introductory Psychology
  • PSYC101 (3) – Introduction to Biological and Cognitive Psychology
  • PSYC102 (3) – Introduction to Developmental, Social, Personality and Clinical Psychology
  • PSYC207 (3) - Contemporary Topics in Biological and Cognitive Psychology
  • PSYC208 (3) - Contemporary Topics in Social, Developmental, Personality, and Clinical Psychology
  • PSYC216 (3) - Questioning Psychological Science in the Media
  • PSYC217 (3) - Research Methods
  • PSYC218 (3) - Analysis of Behavioural Data
  • PSYC270 (3) - Introduction to Behavioural Neuroscience
  • PSYC277 (3) - Behavioural and Neuroscientific Research Methods
  • PSYC278 (3) - Analysis of Behavioural and Neuroscientific Data
  • SOCI100 (6) – Introduction to Sociology
  • SOCI101 (3) – Social Interaction and Culture
  • SOCI102 (3) – Inequality and Social Change
  • SOCI200 (3) – Sociology of Family
  • SOCI201 (3) – Ethnic Relations
  • SOCI210 (3) – Canadian Social Structure
  • SOCI240 (3) – Introduction to Social Interaction

3rd and 4th Year (upper level) Restricted Electives (except those that are required courses). All upper level APBI, BIOC, BIOL, CHEM, FNH and MICB courses.

  • ADHE327 (3) – Teaching Adults
  • ADHE329 (3) – Developing Short Courses, Workshops and Seminars
  • ADHE330 (3) – The Community Practice of Adult Education
  • ADHE412 (3) – An Overview of Adult Education
  • ANTH316 (3/6) – Political Anthropology
  • ANTH329 (3/6) – Contemporary First Nations Issues
  • ANTH330 (3) – Anthropology of Rural Peoples in the Global Economy
  • ANTH407 (3) – Principles of Field Work
  • ANTH428 (3) – Medicine, Technology, Culture and Society
  • ANTH429 (3) – Global Health in Cross-Cultural Contexts
  • CAPS301* (6) – Human Physiology
  • CAPS390* (3) – Introduction to Microscopic Human Anatomy
  • CAPS391* (3) – Introduction to Gross Human Anatomy
  • CHBE344 (3) – Unit Operations I
  • CHBE345 (3) – Unit Operations II
  • CLST301 (3) – The Technical Terms of Medicine and Biological Sciences
  • CNPS362 (3) – Basic Interviewing Skills
  • CNPS363 (3) – Career Counselling
  • CNPS364 (3) – Family Education and Consultation
  • CNPS365 (3) – Introduction to Theories of Counselling
  • ECON302 (3) - Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis I
  • ECON303 (3) - Intermediate Microeconomics II
  • ECON310 (3) – Principles of Microeconomics (equivalent to ECON101)
  • ECON311 (3) – Principles of Macroeconomics (equivalent to ECON102)
  • ECON317 (3) – Poverty and Inequality
  • ECON325 (3) - Introduction to Empirical Economics
  • ECON326 (3) - Methods of Empirical Research in Economics
  • ECON335 (3) – Fertility, Families and Human Migration
  • ECED 407 (3) – Supporting the Early Learning in the Pre-School Years
  • EDCP493 (3) – Special Study in Home Economics: Food Studies
  • EDCP494 (3) - Special Study in Home Economics: Family Studies
  • ENVR300 (3) – Introduction to Research in Environmental Sciences
  • EPSE312 (3) – Introduction to the Study of Exceptional Children
  • EPSE320 (3) – Classroom Inclusion of Students who are Blind and Visually Impaired
  • EPSE436 (3) – Survey of Behaviour Disorders in Children and Adolescents
  • EPSE 437 (3) – Interventions for Children and Adolescents with Behaviour Disorders
  • FMST 312 (3) – Parent-child Relationships
  • FMST314 (3) – Relationship Development
  • FMST316 (3) – Human Sexuality
  • FMST441 (3) – Social Context of Child Development
  • FNH370* (3) – Nutrition Assessment
  • FNH371* (3) – Human Nutrition Over the Life Span
  • FNH398* (3) – Research Methods in Human Nutrition
  • FNH402* (3) – Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals
  • FNH413* (3) – Food Safety
  • FNH472* (3) - Maternal and Fetal Nutrition
  • FNH473* (3) – Applied Public Health Nutrition
  • FNH477* (3) – Nutrition and Disease Prevention
  • FNH497* (2-6) – Directed Studies in Food, Nutrition and Health
  • FNH499* (6) – Undergraduate Thesis
  • FRE302 (3) – Small Business Management in Agri-food Industries
  • FRE306 (3) – Introduction to Global Food Markets
  • FRE340 (3) – International Agricultural Development
  • FRE374 (3) – Land and Resource Economics
  • FRE385 (3) – Quantitative Methods for Business and Resource Management
  • FRE420 (3) – The Economics of International Trade and the Environment
  • FRE490 (3) – Current Issues in Food and Resource Economics
  • FRST430 (3) – Advanced Biometrics
  • GRSJ305 (3) – Social Justice Issues in Community and International Organizing
  • GRSJ310* (3) – Gender, Race, Social Justice and Health
  • HESO400* (3/6) – Sociocultural Determinants of Health
  • KIN303 (3) - High Performance Conditioning in Physical Activity and Sport
  • KIN351 (3) - Biomechanics II Mechanical Properties of Tissues
  • KIN361 (3) - Introduction to Athletic Training
  • KIN373 (3) - Research Methods in Kinesiology
  • KIN375 (3) - Exercise Physiology II
  • KIN425* (3) – Aging, Health, and the Body
  • KIN461 (3) – Prevention of Sports Injuries I
  • KIN464* (3) – Health Promotion and Physical Activity
  • KIN465* (3) – Interculturalism, Health and Physical Activity
  • KIN469* (3) – Chronic Health Issues, Physical Activity and Community Practice
  • KIN471 (3) – Prevention of Sports Injuries II
  • LFS302 (3/6) – International Field Studies
  • LFS340 (3) – First Nations Health and the Traditional Role of Plants
  • LFS400 (3) – Audio Storytelling
  • LFS450 (3) – Land, Food, and Community III: Leadership in Campus Food System Sustainability
  • LFS496 (3/6) – Career Development Internship
  • PATH375* (3) – Introduction to Human Pathology
  • PCTH325* (3) – Rational Basis of Drug Therapy
  • PHIL333* (3/4) – Bio-Medical Ethics
  • PLAN321 (3) – Indigeneity and the City
  • POLI350 (3/6) – Public Policy
  • POLI352 (3/6) – Comparative Politics of Public Policy
  • POLI363 (3/6) – Canadian Foreign Policy
  • POLI364 (3/6) – International Organizations
  • POLI366 (3) – International Political Economy
  • POLI367 (3/6) – International Relations Theory and the International System
  • POLI369 (3/6) – Issues in International Security
  • PSYC300 (3/6) – Abnormal Psychology
  • PSYC301* (3) – Brain Dysfunction and Recovery
  • PSYC302 (3) - Infancy
  • PSYC304 (3/6) – Brain and Behaviour
  • PSYC305 (3/6) – Personality Psychology
  • PSYC306 (3/6) – Principles of Animal Behaviour
  • PSYC307 (3) – Cultural Psychology
  • PSYC308 (3/6) – Social Psychology
  • PSYC309 (3/6) – Cognitive Processes
  • PSYC311 (3) – Psychology of Sport
  • PSYC314* (3) – Health Psychology
  • PSYC315 (3) – Childhood and Adolescence
  • PSYC319 (3) – Applied Developmental Psychology
  • PSYC322 (3) – Adulthood and Aging
  • PSYC360 (3) - Biopsychology
  • PSYC361 (3) – Neuroscience of Motivation
  • PSYC365* (3) – Cognitive Neurosciences
  • PSYC367 (3) – Sensory Systems
  • SOCI301 (3) – Sociology of Development and Underdevelopment
  • SOCI302 (3) – Ethnic and Racial Inequality
  • SOCI324 (3) – Sociology of the Life Course
  • SOCI342 (3) – Consumers and Consumption
  • SOCI344* (3) – Sociology of Aging
  • SOCI360 (3) – Sociology and Natural Resources
  • SOCI361 (3) – Social Inequality
  • SOCI384* (3) – Sociology of Health and Illness
  • SOCI415 (3/6) – Theories of Family and Kinship
  • SOCI420 (3) – Sociology of the Environment
  • SOCI423(3) – Sociology of Food
  • SOCI425 (3) – Urban Sociology
  • SOCI440 (3) – Economic Sociology
  • SOCI473* (3) – Sociology of Mental Illness
  • SOCI479* (3) – Social Determinants of Health
  • SOWK452* (6) – HIV Prevention and Care
  • STAT300 (3) – Intermediate Statistics for Applications
  • SPPH300* (3) – Working in International Health
  • SPPH301* (3) – Understanding the Sociocultural Determinants of the Health of Populations
  • SPPH302* (3) – Topics in Health Informatics for Health/Life Sciences Students
  • SPPH381A* (3) – Public Health Ethics
  • SPPH381C* (3) – Environmental Impacts on Human Health
  • SPPH381D* (3) – Canadian Health Care Policy
  • SPPH404* (3) – First Nations Health: Historical and Contemporary Issues
  • SPPH410* (3) – Improving Public Health
  • SPPH411 (3) – Violence Across the Lifespan
  • SPPH481C (3) – Prison Health

source: https://wiki.ubc.ca/FNH_General/Food_Science/Food_and_Nutritional_Sciences_Double_Major

Minors

You may choose to supplement your Food Science major with a minor program, which involves taking courses in a subject area outside of your specialization. As a student in the Food, Nutrition and Health program at UBC, you are eligible to apply for a Minor in Arts, Commerce, Science, Fermentations, Sustainable Food Systems, or Kinesiology. Read more about minors, including application timelines, right here.

Dual Degree with Master of Management

If you are interested in complementing your LFS degree with a strong foundation in management, consider applying for the Bachelor of Science (Applied Biology) – Master of Management Dual Degree. Please note: admission to this program is primarily available to students coming directly out of high school. Depending on enrolment, the UBC Sauder School of Business may release a limited number of spaces on a competitive basis to students who are going into their third year at UBC (or those who are transferring to UBC for their third year). For more details about this dual-degree program option and for information about how to apply, please see the Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration section of the UBC Academic Calendar.

The Food Science major is competitive, which means you will need to apply if you wish to be considered. Both your academic performance and a letter of intent will be assessed when determining your fit for this major. You can find details about admission requirements and timelines in the UBC Academic Calendar.

To apply for this major, please complete the online application here no later than March 31.

If you are a high school, college or university student interested in pursuing this major at UBC, you should apply for the Bachelor of Science in Food, Nutrition and Health. You can learn more here.

Where Can a UBC Food Science Degree Take You?

Jobs in the food science sector are varied and fascinating. Graduates have gone on to careers such as:

  • food product development technician
  • food analysis technician
  • quality assurance technician or manager
  • HACCP coordinator
  • microbiology technician
  • chemistry technician
  • food processing specialist inspector
  • food laboratory manager
  • consumer product officer
  • How about a bio of alumnus Peter Higgins, whose degree in Food Science powered him on his path to becoming the president of Purdy’s?
  • Or career food scientist Jennifer Martin, whose Food Science degree opened doors at Heinz and Loblaws, and whose own line of botanical-based sodas now stock the shelves at Whole Foods!

Get a head start on your career-related work experience while you’re at UBC. Check out our job board for postings that relate to your field of study!

Got Questions?

If you are a prospective or current student with questions about planning for or choosing this major, or if you have questions about how your transfer credits apply, get in touch! One of our academic advisors in LFS Student Services will be glad to help you.

If you are already in the Food Science major and have specific questions about restricted electives and Directed Studies, please contact your program advisor, Vivien Measday.

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