People

Staff

Dr. Andrew Black - Professor

Faculty of Land and Food Systems

Andy Black is actively involved in research into the energy, water and carbon balances of forests. Over the last 30 years, his research team consisting of graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and technicians, in collaboration with many other scientists, has conducted research on the effects of weather on turbulent exchange in and above vegetation. He was among the first to use the Bowen-ratio-energy-balance technique to measure fluxes above forests. Over the last 15 years, his team has developed an automated eddy covariance and chamber flux measurement systems that can operate year round even in extreme winter conditions. In the mid 1990s, he was a participant in the Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study and a member of a group that laid the foundation for the current international network of CO2/H2O flux sites (Fluxnet). His research team currently operates a network of seven flux sites in western Canada. His group has published a number of papers on the effects of interannual climate variability on the carbon balances of boreal and West Coast forests. As part of the Canadian Climate Research Network, his team contributed significantly to the development of a carbon exchange module for the Canadian Land Surface Scheme (CLASS). He played a major role in the recent establishment of the Fluxnet Canada Research Network, a network of flux towers across Canada to study the effects of climate change and disturbance on the carbon balance of forest and wetland ecosystems. In 2006, his group established flux towers in two lodgepole pine stands near Mackenzie, BC recently attacked by mountain pine beetle and begun an NSERC Strategic project studying the effects of nitrogen fertilization on forest productivity, carbon sequestration and emission of greenhouse gases in west coast Douglas-fir stands. He is a member of the editorial board of the journal, Agricultural and Forest Meteorology.

Biometrology and Soil Physics Group at UBC website.

Email contact: ablack@interchange.ubc.ca


Dr. Sandra Brown - Research Associate

Faculty of Land and Food Systems

Dr. Sandra Brown is a sessional lecturer and research associate with the Faculty of Land and Food Systems. Her research activities focus on the natural and human impacted processes that affect land and water resources available for communities and ecosystems. She works extensively in land and water resource management in mountain regions both within Canada and internationally, including Nepal, Bhutan, China, Colombia, Bolivia and Nicaragua. Sandra is co-author of numerous multimedia CD-ROMs, and has developed and delivered numerous educational programs including courses on Water and International Development, Environmental Sensitive Area Assessment, and Soil and Water Conservation.

Sandra Brown's website.

Email contact: sjbrown@interchange.ubc.ca


Dr. Sietan Chieng - Professor

Civil Engineering and Faculty of Land and Food Systems

Sietan Chieng’s website.

Email contact: chieng@interchange.ubc.ca


Dr. Andreas Christen - Assistant Professor

Department of Geography and Atmospheric Science Program

Andreas Christen's research focuses on land-atmosphere interactions, carbon cycling, and atmospheric turbulence. His group uses experimental field methods and develop models to investigate physical, chemical and anthropogenic processes relevant in the land-atmosphere exchange in urban and vegetated ecosystems.

Andreas' research group's website.

Email contact: andreas.christen@ubc.ca


MSc. Nick Grant - Researcher

Nick Grant is responsible for Biomet Database and plays major role in proposal writing.

Nick Grant’s website.

Email contact: nick.grant@ubc.ca


MSc. Martin Hilmer - Research Technician

Faculty of Land and Food Systems

MSc. Martin Hilmer is the Research Technician for the Faculty of Land and Food Systems, as well as the Instructor for Soil Science 200 (OLT-Distance Education). His central role is supporting the Faculty in both technical and administrative matters. Further, he is also part of a teaching team for Agro 260 and 360. He also facilitates laboratory activities in Soil Science 200 and Agro 403. His involvement with SWEL is ensuring safety and logistical protocols as well as technical support within certain areas including primary soil analysis (LECO CN-2000).

Email contact: mire@interchange.ubc.ca


Dr. Rachhpal (Paul) Jassal - Research Associate

Faculty of Land and Food Systems

Dr. Rachhpal Jassal is a soil scientist with interests in carbon sequestration, greenhouse gas emissions, soil-nutrient-water interactions, and management of problematic soils. He has nearly three-decades of experience in soil science research, teaching and extension, and has worked on both basic (process-based) as well as applied (fertilizers, irrigation and tillage in relation to crop production) aspects of soil science research in UK, Philippines, India and Canada, has supervised the work of technicians and graduate students, and has lead interdisciplinary research teams and coordinated research projects. Since 2002, he is working as a Research Associate at UBC and is a member of the Canadian Carbon Program. Emphasis of his research is to evaluate the role of environmental variables and forest management on carbon sequestration and soil N2O and CO2 emissions, and to understand the partitioning of ecosystem respiration into its above- and below-ground components. He has developed models of soil heat, water, and CO2 transport and exchange, and heterotrophic and autotrophic components of soil respiration. Paul is involved in many collaborative studies within and outside BC and works as a resource person and provides central facility of measuring gas diffusivity in soils from various CCP sites. He has authored or co-authored more than 80 research papers, including 2 reviews, 3 book chapters and a White Paper on Forestry, and several reports, and written a number of successful project grant applications.

Email contact: rachhpal@interchange.ubc.ca


Dr. Mark Johnson - Assistant Professor

Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability (IRES) and Department for Earth and Ocean Sciences (EOS)

Dr. Mark Johnson is an ecohydrologist with interests in watershed processes and biogeochemistry at various spatial scales, ranging from the soil pore to watershed and global analyses. His work seeks to identify biophysical linkages between natural processes and human activities related to water resources. He has conducted research in forested, agricultural, and mixed land use environments in temperate, tropical and boreal regions, including over 10 years of experience in developing countries. Mark has conducted extensive field work in the Brazilian Amazon investigating landscape-scale interactions between forest ecology, hydrology, carbon and nutrient dynamics and forest management. An ongoing focus of his research concerns interactions between the carbon cycle and the water cycle. Present research projects in this area include CO2 dynamics at the terrestrial aquatic interface of the Pantanal wetland ecosystem in South America, and investigations on impacts of forest management on dissolved greenhouse gas dynamics in British Columbia’s coastal forests.

Mark Johnson’s website .

Email contact: mark.johnson@ubc.ca

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Dr. Maja Krzic - Associate Professor

Faculty of Land and Food Systems and Faculty of Forestry

Dr. Maja Krzic, is a soil scientist and her research focuses on identification of soil properties and processes affecting ecosystem responses to land-use practices. In her program, Maja pursues the following two complementary areas of research (1) land-use impacts on soil formation processes and (2) development of predictive soil quality indicators. These studies provide fundamental understanding of soil sensitivity and resilience to land-use changes resulting from human activity and climate change. Maja has conducted research in forest, grassland, agricultural, and urban land-use environments. Her current research interests include development of soil quality indicators for assessing management impacts on grassland soils, forest soil response to severe mechanical disturbance, and soil compaction susceptibility. To augment and extend her study on land-use impacts on soil processes, Maja has taken an initiative in integrating research, teaching, and community education through application of information technology. As part of this initiative, she has developed several web-based, interactive teaching tools that are broadly used in post-secondary institutions across Canada.

Maja Krzic’s website.

More information on Forestry home page.

Email contact: maja.krzic@ubc.ca


Dr. Les Lavkulich - Professor Emeritus

(SWEL Chair) Faculty of Land and Food Systems

Les Lavkulich's research activities contribute to advancing an understanding of fundamental soil processes (pedogenesis) as affected by both natural and anthropogenic factors, at both temporal and spatial scales. Of particular interest is the formation of high specific surface materials that are mainly responsible for sorption, retention and release properties of soils for nutrients, contaminants and pollutants. It is these dynamic, high surface area components in the soil that attenuate anthropogenic contaminants by sorption and biological degradation processes and reduce the undesirable effects on the environment. The same materials are controlling factors in nutrient and water relations with respect to plant growth. This research contributes to the necessary understanding of natural soil resilience and inherent capabilities to sustain ecological services, including the carbon, nutrient and water cycles. The research provides an index of the natural capacity of soils to absorb anthropogenic effects and provides a comparison point from which to assess the effects of human impacts on terrestrial ecosystems and the capability of the soil resource to sustain ecosystem management. This experience is applied to other natural resource systems, notably the carbon and hydrological cycles. More recently, Les has been involved in international concerns, sponsored by NATO, focusing on “Integrated Water Basin Management”. The specific goal of the NATO initiative is to provide a credible scientific base for equitable and sustained water resource management, a growing global issue with potential human security concerns. The focus has been on sustaining ecological integrity of water basins and equitable international approaches for the utilization water, for human needs, irrigation, waste assimilation, ecological services, biodiversity, energy (hydroelectric and nuclear) and industry.

Email contact: lml@interchange.ubc.ca

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Dominic Lessard - Research Engineer

Faculty of Land and Food Systems

Dominic Lessard is a Research Technician with the Biometeorology Group, in the Faculty of Land and Food System. His central role is to coordinate the maintenance and the improvement of the Campbell River Research Stations and all its scientific instrumentation. He is also closely involved with the Boreal Ecosystem Research and Monitoring Sites (BERMS) located in Prince-Albert, Saskatchewan. He is responsible for the data quality control of the two oldest carbon flux towers in Canada. Recently, he was also involved in the design and the conception of the Mountain Pine Beettle flux towers located in Mackenzie, BC. Dominic's role with the Soil, Water and Environment Laboratory (SWEL) his to provide a technical expertise and support for all activities taking place at the Campbell River sites.

Email contact: dominic.lessard@.ubc.ca


Dr. Marina Molodovskaya - Postdoctoral Fellow

Marina Molodovskaya is a Post-Doctoral Fellow working in the Soil, Water and Air Laboratory (SWAL), directly under the supervision of Dr. Öberg. Her current work is on soil-to-air emission of chlorinated volatiles and its connection to the hydrological cycle and greenhouse gas emissions. For her doctoral research, Marina has conducted a long-term study of nitrous oxide gas from the fertilized agricultural fields in the New York State, using micrometeorological eddy covariance instrumentation. Marina’s research focuses on the biogeochemistry of nutrient cycling and transformations ross different environmental media (soil, water, air) in natural and agricultural ecosystems. Marina is also interested in the development and application of the modern, technologically advanced methods and instrumentation for the environmental analysis.

Supervisor: Dr. Gunilla Öberg

Email contact: m.molodovskaya@exchange.ubc.ca


MSc. Zoran Nesic - Senior Research Engineer

Faculty of Land and Food Systems

Zoran Nesic is a Senior Research Engineer with the Biometeorology Group and with SWEL in the Faculty of Land and Food Systems. He is responsible for management of numerous research and equipment design projects for various faculties and departments at UBC (mainly the Faculty of Land and Food Systems, but also the Faculty of Forestry and Department of Geography). Zoran’s equipment designs of eddy covariance and soil respiration systems are widely used at various North American universities (McMaster University, University of Alberta, University of Minnesota and all Canadian universities that participate in the Canadian Carbon Program) and other research institutions (Environment Canada and the Canadian Forest Service). Zoran has been contributing to the preparation and implementation of the measurement protocols for large North American research networks including Canadian Carbon Program, Ameriflux and the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON). Zoran’s main research interests are (1) the design of automated measurement systems for long-term environmental measurements and (2) the standardization of data acquisition, quality-assurance/quality-control and data processing to insure reproducibility of research results.

Email contact: zoran.nesic@ubc.ca


Dr. Gunilla Öberg - Professor

Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability (IRES), College for Interdisciplinary Studies (CFIS) and faculty associate, Faculty of Land and Food Systems

Dr. Gunilla Öberg has a deep interest in collaborative projects that involve students and scholars of diverse backgrounds. She also has a profound interest in transacademic research, i.e. research and education conducted in interaction with partners outside academia. These interests took her to UBC in October 2006 when she became Director of the Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability (IRES). Gunilla has participated in and lead a number of interdisciplinary research and educational projects related to environmental and sustainability issues. Some of these projects have been closely tied to her own research interests, in other projects, her role has been more that of a facilitator. Some projects have been interdisciplinary within the natural science sphere but most projects span the natural science-social science divide. Gunilla’s research in SWEL focuses on The Biogeochemistry of Chlorine and Sustainable Water Stewardship. She is a faculty associate of the Faculty of Land and Food Systems.

Email contact: goberg@ires.ubc.ca


Dr. Maria-Cecilia Roa - Postdoctoral Fellow

Wetlands and water dynamics in tropical Andean headwater catchments

Water scarcity is an increasingly important issue, even in areas of relative abundance where annual precipitation is high such as the tropical mountains of Colombia, where large portions of the population face water shortages during parts of the year. The municipality of Filandia with 15,000 people, demands more water than what is available during the dry season and water scarcity is unequally distributed, the poor bearing more intensive shortages. Small municipalities and water purveyors have significantly less resources to improve supply and secure equal access to water, and in many cases rely solely on natural ecosystems to provide temporal water supply regulation. This project has been developed in collaboration with the municipality of Filandia, the environmental regional government agency – CRQ, the local water purveyors and the community. The aim of Cecilia’s thesis is to quantify the capacity of headwater catchments to regulate water flows, identify the key components and features that contribute to such regulation and provide a comparative analysis of the effects of land use and wetlands on water availability and temporal regulation of flows.

Email contact: mroa@cgiar.org

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Dr. Hans Schreier - Professor Emeritus

Faculty of Land and Food Systems and Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability (IRES)

Hans Schreier's research focuses on watershed management, land-water interactions, non-point sources of pollution in urban and agricultural areas, stormwater management, water needs for food production, and climate change adaptation strategies. He has worked extensively in the Himalayan and Andean Region of the world and in the mountains of British Columbia.

Hans Schreier's website.

More information on projects.

Email contact: star@interchange.ubc.ca


MSc. Rachel Strivelli - Research Associate

I am developing a web-based teaching tool that illustrates the human impact on soil formation and soil properties. The objectives of my project are (1) to determine how different land uses impact Podzol formation and (2) to develop a teaching tool that will allow students to evaluate impacts of land use practices on soil properties. The Land Use Impacts (LUI) tool focuses on the most common soil type present on UBC campus and will include instructional technologies, soils data from 1970 and 2005, archival photos, geology maps, and historical narratives. The tool will be complimentary to post-secondary courses that address issues of land-use impacts on soils.

Supervisor: Dr. Maja Krzic

Email contact: rachelstrive@gmail.com


Dr. Teresia Svensson -

Visiting Postdoctoral Fellow

Research Description: Teresia Svensson has a PhD in Water and Environmental Studies from Linköping University (LiU), Sweden. Her research interests revolve around the role of soil processes in trace gas biogeochemistry in general, and soil-atmosphere-water interactions and fluxes of chlorine in particular. During her previous research she has both explored chloride retention processes in soil and chlorine transport in soil and catchments subjected to forest management. Through the Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning (Formas) funded post doc, I’m examining the soil-atmosphere exchange of chlorinated volatiles in a temperate rainforest at SWAL, UBC.

Supervisor: Dr. Gunilla Öberg

Teresia Svensson’s website.

Email contact: teresia.svensson@liu.se


Students

Jacqueline Belzile - MA Student

(RMES Program)

Thesis title: Lessons on Adaptation from Oz to the Okanagan: An international Exchange of Water Resource Management Strategies.

Currently, one of the greatest problems for Okanagan water managers is defining how to plan for a multi-year water crisis without actually having one. What are the issues that will arise? What challenges will the community face? What are the possible paths to confronting a water shortage? How can the Okanagan Basin Water Board, in consultation with community leaders, industry, and researchers, balance the needs of agriculture, industry, community members, and the ecosystem? We aim to answer these questions by drawing on the experiences of those who have been managing an ongoing water crisis in Australia; by building relationships and local adaptive capacity through collaboration to support sustainable water strategies in the Okanagan. The goal of Jacquie’s thesis project is to coordinate, facilitate, and document a knowledge exchange process that brings water managers from the Okanagan to Australia to learn lessons in water scarcity adaptation. The project goals include knowledge transfer (through case studies and Australian experiences), local capacity building for managers in the Okanagan (develop innovative water strategies into a toolkit), and improved water governance (develop policy recommendations to deal with water shortage in the future).

Supervisor: Dr. Gunilla Öberg

Email contact: JABelzile@aol.com

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Mathieu Beaulieu - MSc. Student

(RMES Program)

Thesis title: Climate change impact in a coastal community watershed: investigating the summer streamflow response to a shifting hydrological regime.

Mathieu holds a Bachelor’s degree from the Université du Québec à Montréal with a major in geography. He earned a minor in geosciences from the University of Iceland. As an undergraduate student, his focus was on glacial geomorphology, paleoclimatology and water resource management. For his Master’s thesis, Mathieu is investigating the impact of a diminishing snowpack on the late summer hydrology of a headwater system located in BC’s Sunshine Coast. Mathieu is using environmental stable isotopes and other geochemical tracers to build a better understanding of runoff processes following snowmelt and rain events. The research is grounded in a context of climate change, whereby most of the winter precipitation in the study area is expected to turn into rain by the 2050s.

Supervisors: Dr. Gunilla Öberg and Dr. Hans Schreier

Email contact: beam09@hotmail.com


Carmen Emmel - PhD. Student (ATSC Program)

Thesis title:

Research Description: Carmen Emmel's research focuses on the need to minimize disturbance of the local and regional energy, carbon and water balances in Mountain Pine Beetle attacked forest stands with the goal to provide experimental data required in modeling carbon dioxide (CO2), water vapour (H2O) and sensible heat transfer between MPB-attacked forest ecosystems and the atmosphere. She analyzes the impact of management strategies on stand microclimate, growth conditions and exchange processes. These detailed assessments are essential to understand the dynamics of insect-disturbed ecosystems and to improve the current soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer (SVAT) schemes used in regional-scale carbon and climate modeling. In particular her research goals are (1) to quantify and compare the changes in microclimate and growth conditions (radiation, temperature and wind regimes) in the canopy of lodgepole pine stands following different management strategies, (2) to identify the vertical distribution of sources, sinks and the nature of exchange processes of sensible heat, H2O and CO2 in those forest stands, and ultimately (3) to contribute to an enhanced and more accurate implementation of canopy-atmosphere interactions in SVAT schemes.

Supervisor: Dr. Andreas Christen

Email contact:


Christian Evans - MSc. Student

(Soil Science Program)

Thesis title: Effects of seasonal grazing systems on soil quality in southern interior of British Columbia.

Focus of my study is twofold: (1) to determine the effects of 30 years of cattle grazing at a moderate grazing rate of 2 AUM ha-1 relative to the ungrazed control on selected soil physical and chemical properties, including bulk density, mechanical resistance, pH, total C and N, available P, polysaccharides, aggregate stability, and root biomass; and (2) to determine the effects of 30 years spring and fall grazing systems on the selected soil physical and chemical properties listed above. My study is part of an ongoing long-term grazing experiment, carried out in the southern interior of BC, examining grazing effects on animal production and plant community composition.

Supervisor: Dr. Maja Krzic

Email contact: crwevans@interchange.ubc.ca


Stephanie Grand - PhD Student (RMES Program)

The objective of my thesis is to understand the effects of forest harvesting on soil chemistry. To this end we have sampled undisturbed and logged soils in Roberts Creek research forest, on the Sunshine coast of British Columbia. We focus our analyses on changes in soil carbon, nutrients, available aluminum, and poorly crystalline material such as imogolite-type material.

Supervisor: Dr. Les Lavkulich

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Laura Grant - MSc. Student (RMES Program)

Thesis title: Quantifying sources of organic matter in the drinking water supply in the Chapman Creek using fluorescence spectroscopy.

The Chapman Creek Watershed is major source the drinking water for 23,000 people in the Sunshine Coast region, providing almost 90% of its drinking water in 2001. It is also one of the most sensitive coastal mountain watersheds, especially when considering climate change effects and human impacts. Estimates of how the watershed will function in the future and how the watershed can be effectively and responsibly managed can only be made if current conditions are fully understood. Effective and responsible management of water resources is possible if the major processes that impact water quality and how Chapman Creek Watershed naturally functions is fully understood. Chapman Creek is fed by rainfall in the autumn and winter, and snowmelt in the spring and summer and there is a very small capacity to store water within the watershed. The watershed has been logged in the past and now faces significant urban development. The watershed is also prone to sporadic incidences of colour. It is not known what causes sporadic occurrences of colour, nor the implications for drinking water of these occurrences. The sporadic occurrence of colour from organic matter is creating significant difficulties for the water treatment operation in Chapman Creek and the overall goal of Laura’s thesis is to characterize the sources and temporal occurrence of organic matter and aluminum in stream water on the Sunshine Coast.

Supervisors: Dr. Gunilla Öberg and Dr. Hans Schreier

Email contact: lauraegrant@gmail.com


Iain Hawthorne - PhD. Student (EOS Program)

Thesis title:

Research Description:

Supervisor: Dr. Mark Johnson

Email contact: ihawth81@interchange.ubc.ca


Ashlee Jollymore - PhD. Student (RMES Program)

Thesis title:

Research Description:

Supervisor: Dr. Mark Johnson

Email contact: ashlee.jollymore@gmail.com


Adrian Leitch - PhD. Student

(ATSC Program)

Thesis title:

Research Description:

Supervisors: Drs. A. Black and A. Christen.

Email contact: aleitch@interchange.ubc.ca


Natalie Maurer - MSc. Student (RMES Program)

Thesis title: Modeling Increasing Urban Demand in the Okanagan Basin: Focusing on Outdoor Use.

The Okanagan Basin, located in south-central British Columbia, is the most arid area per capita in Canada. Due to its mild climate, the Basin is popular for tourists, retirement and is ideal for agricultural activities; therefore, as the population of the Basin increases, competing demands will put a strain on the area’s water resources. Overall, the population of the Okanagan is expected to increase by roughly 30% over the next 30 years which will occur primarily in the larger cities (Kelowna, Penticton and Vernon). Currently, roughly half of the annual residential water use is for outdoor purposes (i.e. watering lawns); therefore, the way that development occurs in the Basin will have a significant impact on water requirements for urban areas in the future. In my thesis research, I am using spatial analysis (GIS) to model where this urban growth will occur. These urban growth scenarios can then be used to approximate the irrigation requirement then needed for these new developments. Ideally this research will provide a planning tool for management of water resources in the Okanagan Basin.

Supervisor: Dr. Hans Schreier

Email contact: nhlmaurer@gmail.com


Eugenie Paul-Limoges

Undergraduate Research Assistant (Geography)

Research Description: Eugenie Paul-Limoges' research interests are in biometeorology, climatology/meteorology, forest ecology, and soil science. She has been working as a research assistant for the micrometeorology lab for the past year on a project looking at the carbon-dioxide, energy and water vapour exchanges of mountain pine beetle affected stands.

Supervisor: Dr. Andreas Christen

Email contact:


Clara Roa-Garcia - PhD. Student

(Soils Program)

Thesis title: "Cadmium transportation and bioavailability in a source for drinking water in Cali, Colombia, South America"

Long term exposure to cadmium can cause high blood pressure, iron-poor blood, liver disease, nerve or brain damage, lung damage and fragile bones. It can also induce skeletal malformations in animals. The main source of cadmium is food. Because it would be difficult to reduce cadmium intake in food, intake from water should be as low as possible. Cali's main source of drinking water is the Cauca River. There are identified some anthropogenic sources of cadmium such as industrial wastewaters and a landfill. Clara is interested in the processes that affect transportation of cadmium from these sources and the factors that contribute to increase its bioavailability. Knowing those processes and factors, conditions may be better controlled for water treatment, to prevent seasonal ingestion of elevated concentrations of cadmium in drinking water.

Supervisors: Dr. Maja Krzic and Dr. Sandra Brown

Email contact: clararoa55@hotmail.com


Adrienne Scott - MSc. Student

(Forestry Program)

Thesis title: "Effects of fire on hydrophobicity of forest soils"

My study focuses on soil water repellency after wildfire in 8 locations across the southern BC. The objectives of my study are to (1) determine the factors (burning, soil characteristics, vegetation, elevation and aspect) affecting soil water repellency and (2) compare several pragmatic methodologies, both in situ and under laboratory conditions. The need for this research arose from several erosion events on water repellent soils after the wildfires in 2003 and 2004. These landslides caused damage to several houses and watersheds in the Okanagan Valley and the Kootenays.

Supervisors: Dr. Maja Krzic and Dr. David Scott, UBC-O, Kelowna.

Email contact: a.tree.enne@gmail.com


Jack Zhou - BSc. Honours Student

(ENVR Program)

Thesis title:

Research Description:

Supervisor: Dr. Mark Johnson

Email contact: jack2k7@interchange.ubc.ca


Alumni

Dr. Christian Bruemmer - Post Doctoral Fellow

Christian Bruemmer was in charge of DF49 data quality control and analyzing BC Flux Station eddy-covariance data.

Email contact: christian.bruemmer@ubc.ca


Aio Häberli - Internship Student

Aio, who has a BSc. in Environmental Sciences, is an internship student from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich (ETH) in Switzerland where he is completing his master degree in Environmental Sciences with a focus in biogeochemistry. At SWEL, Aio participated in work at the Campbell River Field Site. At the lab, he carryied out calibration studies for the analysis of volatile organohalogens on the newly purchased GC/TDS system. In addition, he prepared samples and conducts analyses on the Ion Chromatograph.

Supervisor: Dr. Gunilla Öberg

Email contact: aioh@student.ethz.ch


Kirsten Harma - MSc.

Thesis title: Changing with the flow: an analysis of water supply and demand in a subwatershed of the Okanagan basin, British Columbia

Kirsten Harma completed her MSc in Resource Management and Environmental Studies (RMES) with a thesis focused on climatic and land use scenario modeling for a subwatershed in the Okanagan Basin of BC. Previously she completed a BSc in Environmental Science at Western Washington University.

Supervisor: Dr. Mark Johnson

Email contact: kharma08@interchange.ubc.ca


Andrew Hum – Technician

Andrew Hum was a field technician for BC Flux Station sites.

Email contact: ahum@interchange.ubc.ca


MSc. Trudy Naugler

Faculty of Land and Food Systems

Trudy Naugler was the SWAL Laboratory Coordinator. She was responsible for the day to day operations of the laboratory and was the principal operator of the FIA (Lachat) and ICP-ES instruments. Her current research project is focused on water quantity and quality related to rates of pine beetle infestation and salvage logging. Trudy is a graduate of the RMES program at UBC with special interests in water resources and watershed management, including land use effects on water resources. She also spent 5 months in West Africa doing health and hygiene work.

Email contact: tnaugler@interchange.ubc.ca


MSc. Anton Pitts - Laboratory Technician

SWEL and Doctoral Student at Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability (IRES)

Anton Pitts is a PhD student in the RMES program, examining ethics, philosophy, and management issues in wildlife viewing and ecotourism in true interdisciplinary fashion. Anton worked as a laboratory technician at SWEL, and was the principal operator of the automated quick furnace combustion ion chromatography system.

Email contact: apitts@interchange.ubc.ca


Yihai (Simon) Zhao - Ph.D.

Thesis title: Compaction susceptibility of forest soils in BC.

The widespread use of heavy equipment during timber harvesting and site preparation can lead to reduced soil productivity and warrants development of new methods to assess compaction. I am concentrating on identifying soil properties that govern compaction susceptibility. The novelty of this research is to use parameters such as maximum bulk density, obtained by the Proctor soil engineering test, to improve interpretations of soil bulk density for forest productivity evaluations. In our recent publication (Zhao et al. 2008. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 72:442–452), we showed that liquid and plastic limits, soil organic matter, and oxalate extractable oxides can be used to successfully predict maximum bulk density; and that stratification of the sample set by plasticity allows for substantially improved predictions of maximum bulk density using multiple regression analysis. In undertaking this area of research, I hope to provide a soil index that could be used to predict tree growth under different levels of soil compaction. Similar studies have been carried out with annual crops, but there are no studies with tree species in forest ecosystems.

Supervisor: Dr. Maja Krzic

Email contact: zhyihai@interchange.ubc.ca

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