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Soil Classification

4. Canadian System of Soil Classification

There are five classes (taxa) recognized in the hierarchical scheme used for the Canadian System of Soil Classification. A summary of the principles used for differentiating between taxa, from the highest to the lowest level of generalization, is presented below.  

Taxa

Principles used

No. of classes

Order

Dominant soil-forming process

10

Great group

Strength of soil-forming process

31

Subgroup

Kind and arrangement of horizons

231

Family

Parent material characteristics

about 10,000

Series

Detailed features of the pedon

about 100,000

 

 

Soil Orders of Canada
Soil Orders of Canada: The University of British Columbia and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.

The objective of this teaching tool is to provide video footage of soil identification and classification. The teaching tool consists of 10 videos that illustrate characteristics of 10 soil orders within the Canadian System of Soil Classification. Numerous soil description and identification techniques are demonstrated. This material provides a valuable teaching resource for various courses in soil science, agriculture, forestry, and natural resource management either as an in-class or off-campus review.

 

Source: University of British Columbia with the participation of:  Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Thompson Rivers University, Trinity Western University, & University of Northern British Columbia, Funding Provided by: BC Campus Online Development Funds

 

Map of Canada showing the 12 zones that Correspond with the most Common Distribution of 10 Soil Orders.

Click on the image to view interactive images and Canadian Soil Zones map

Slide Show Images - Source: Unless otherwise noted, soil profiles were taken from the Canadian Soil Information System, available online 
http://sis.agr.gc.ca/cansis/

All soils are classified according to the Canadian System of Soil Classification, available online
http://sis.agr.gc.ca/cansis/references/1998sc_a.html

 

Faculty of Land and Food Systems
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA